Saturday, 20 June 2015

Visit of Ringu Tulku Rinpoche 27th July - 1st August 2015 - extra teachings 2nd August

This year Rinpoche has agreed to teach on approaching death according to the Buddhist Tradition: At Kagyu Samye Dzong Dublin, he will give four evening teachings on The Bardo Thodöl, or Tibetan Book of the Dead. This classic text outlines the journey of consciousness after physical death, as taught in the Tibetan Tradition.

The PUBLIC TALK on Tuesday 28th July - 7.30 pm will address the topic, Living and Dying: a Buddhist perspective.   Hosted by Bodhicharya Ireland and Our Lady's Hospice, at the Education and Research Centre, OUR LADY'S HOSPICE, Harold's Cross Road, Dublin 6W.

WEEKEND TEACHINGS : Saturday 1st August 10.30am - 5pm, and Sunday 2nd August 10.30 - 1pm

GOOD IN THE BEGINNING, GOOD IN THE MIDDLE, GOOD IN THE END: 
a Buddhist Approach to Life and Death  

VENUE CHANGED,  it will now be at the HILTON HOTEL, KILMAINHAM, DUBLIN 8.

All sessions will include teachings from Ringu Tulku Rinpoche and give time for questions from the floor.

Entrance:
The Public talk at Our Lady's Hospice: suggested donations at the door 10 euro. Booking is not necessary.  Enquiries:  email  bodhicharya.ireland@gmail.com,  tel: 087 286 1090

Evening sessions at KSD: suggested donation 15 euro per evening.
Bookings contact KSD  tel: 01 4537427

Saturday and Sunday Sessions at HILTON HOTEL KILMAINHAM, Inchicore Road, Dublin 8  Contact Bodhicharya Ireland. Course fee Sat all day :30 euros.  Sun morning : 15 euros
We need to set a charge to cover costs but we are happy to receive what you are able to offer, your presence is more important!

There will be an opportunity to donate to  Rigul Trust which is currently working to raise funds for a nunnery that was completely devastated in the earthquake in a remote region of Nepal. The nuns who survived are being temporarily sheltered in a warehouse in Kathmandu and are in need of food, medical care and a permanent home.
Rigul Trust is Rinpoche's Charity that helps to support his monastery in Eastern Tibet where young people are fed, educated, and given medical care by a small team of doctors, nurses and teachers who depend on the generosity of donors for all their income.








No comments: